“DODSWORTH” (1936) Review

“DODSWORTH” (1936) Review

I might as well place my cards on the table. William Wyler has been one of my favorite Old Hollywood directors for as long as I can remember. One particular movie that had impressed me as a teenager and a woman in my 20s was his 1936 film, “DODSWORTH”. However, a good number of years had passed since I last saw it. Realizing this, I decided to view the movie again for a new assessment.

Based upon Sinclair Lewis’ 1929 novel and Sidney Howard’s 1934 stage adaptation, “DODSWORTH” tells the story of a Midwestern auto tycoon named Sam Dodsworth, who decides to sell his auto manufacturing plant and retire at the urging of his wife Fran. Feeling trapped by their small-town social life, Fran also convinces Sam to start off his retirement with a trip to Europe. Sam comes to regard the trip as an opportunity to see the sights. Fran has different ideas. She views the trip as an opportunity to escape her Midwestern life and enjoy the pleasures of European high society. She manages to achieve this with a succession of European Lotharios by her side. The different desires and expectations of the pair eventually fractures their marriage for good.

When all is said and done, “DODSWORTH” is basically a portrait of a failing marriage. A part of me wondered why“DODSWORTH” had never been filmed during Hollywood’s pre-Code era. Sinclair Lewis’ tale seemed aptly suited for that particular period in film history. I tried to remember how many movies I have seen or heard about a failing marriage and divorce and realized they were few in numbers. Another aspect of “DODSWORTH” I found interesting was director William Wyler and screenwriter Sidney Howard’s attempt to portray the Dodsworths’ marital breakup with as much maturity as possible. One could easily blame the Fran Dodsworth for the marriage’s eventual failure, due to the character’s vanity, infatuation with European high society and infidelity. But I read somewhere that both Wyler and Howard (especially the former) went out of their way to portray Fran with as much sympathy and complexity as possible – especially in the movie’s first half.

I do believe that Wyler, Howard and the movie’s cast did an excellent job in their attempt to create a realistic and mature film. I found scenes in the film that seemed to exemplify this attempt at mature melodrama. They include Ruth’s embarassing last conversation with Captain Clyde Lockert, the good-looking British Army officer she had flirted with aboard the ocean liner that took her and Sam to Europe; the Dodsworths’ last conversation before Sam returns to the U.S.; and their frank conversation about Fran’s affair with aging playboy Arnold Iselin upon Sam’s return to Europe. But the two best scenes – well shot by Wyler and superbly performed – featured Fran’s even more embarassing encounter with Baroness Von Obersdorf, the elderly mother of the young Baron Kurt Von Obersdorf, whom she wished to marry; and Sam and Fran’s last moment together in which the former decides to end their marriage permanently. Watching this movie, it was easy for me to see why “DODSWORTH” managed to earn seven Academy Award nominations – including a Best Director nomination for William Wyler and one for Best Picture.

Two of those nominations were for technical achievements. Richard Day not only earned a nomination for the movie’s art direction, he also won. And I could see why, especially in the images below:

Dodsworth_1936_Halton_Marlowe_H-4

Day’s work seemed to feature a clean, yet stylish look that was evocative of the Art Deco period of the 1920s and 30s.

At least two cast members earned Oscar nominations for their performances. Walter Huston earned a well-deserved nomination for his natural and down-to-earth portrayal of the very likeable and mature retired tycoon, Sam Dodsworth. A surprising Best Supporting Actress nomination was given to Maria Ouspenskaya in a small role as Baroness Von Obersdorf, the woman whom Fran Dodsworth hoped to call “mother-in-law”. I cannot deny that Ouspenskaya was very effective as the frank and no-nonsense German aristocrat who crushed Fran’s dreams of marriage to the younger Kurt Von Obersdorf. But I rather doubt if I would have considered her for an Oscar nomination. The movie also featured competent performances from Mary Astor, Kathryn Marlowe, John Payne, Spring Byington and Gregory Gaye. The two more memorable performances – at least for me – came from a young David Niven as the well-born British Army officer, who teaches Fran a lesson about flirtation and Paul Lukas as the much older Lothario, Arnold Iselin, who seemed amused by the chaos he causes within the Dodsworth marriage. But for me, Ruth Chatterton gave the best performance in the film. Despite the negative manner in which her character was written, her portrayal of the vain Fran Dodsworth provided the film with backbone, drive and a great deal of first-rate drama. “DODSWORTH” would be nothing without the Fran Dodsworth character . . . and Chatterton’s superb performance. And yet . . . the actress did not receive an Academy Award nomination.

In the end, “DODSWORTH” is a very well made movie. Actually, it is quite superbly made. I can see why it earned those seven Oscar nominations. But despite the excellent direction, acting and writing .. . I ended up hating this film. I hated the unbalanced portrayal of the Dodsworth marriage. I hated how the story placed all of the blame for the marriage’s failure on Fran. If Wyler was trying to portray Fran in a more flexible light, he and Sidney Howard failed miserably in the end. I hated how Howard’s screenplay portrayed Fran’s flaws in a serious light, whereas Dodsworth’s flaws – namely his own penchant for self-absorption at home – was portrayed as comic relief. I hated the fact that Sam Dodsworth ended up with a younger and more beautiful woman who seemed to be portrayed as an ideal woman, despite her divorce status. I especially hated the fact that Dodsworth was portrayed as a nearly ridiculously idealized character – the self made man who still adhered to good old-fashioned American values, while Fran was portrayed as an incredibly flawed woman who had failed to live up to American society’s ideal of a married woman.

I realize there are many women moviegoers who really enjoyed this film. But this is one woman who disliked it. And “DODSWORTH” might be one of the few William Wyler films I may never have a desire to watch again.

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“THE LADY VANISHES” (1938) Review

 

“THE LADY VANISHES” (1938) Review

During a seventeen year period between 1922 and 1939, legendary director Alfred Hitchcock became one of the more prolific directors during the early years of British cinema. Films such as 1934’s “THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH” and 1935’s “THE 39 STEPS” caught the attention of film critics and Hollywood producers. But it was 1938’s “THE LADY VANISHES” that paved the way for Hitchcock to achieve Hollywood fame and fortune.

Based upon Ethel Lina White’s 1936 novel, “The Wheel Spins”“THE LADY VANISHES” is about a young English woman named Iris Henderson, who stumbles across a mystery surrounding the disappearance of an elderly woman and fellow Briton from a train traveling westward, across Europe. In the fictional country of Bandrika, a group of travelers eager to resume their journey west is delayed by an avalanche that has blocked the railway tracks. Most of the travelers bunk at a local hotel, where Iris and her two friends had been staying for their holiday. Later that night, a folk singer plays a tune that catches the attention of the elderly Miss Froy (May Whitty), who has been working abroad for several years as a governess. Before the singer can finish his tune, he is silenced . . . murdered.

The following morning, the rail tracks are cleared and the passengers are able to resume their journeys. Iris, who plans to marry a wealthy man upon her return to England, becomes one of the train’s passengers. While waiting to board the train, a flower pot meant for Miss Foy, hits Iris on the head. Other passengers include a young English musicologist named Gilbert; Miss Froy; a adulterous couple named “Mr. and Mrs. Todhunter”, who are returning home to their respective spouses; Caldicott and Charters, two friends eager to return to England for a cricket match; and a Central European surgeon named Dr. Egon Hartz, who is accompanying a patient to his clinic. Iris and Miss Froy become acquainted, first in their compartment and later, in the dining car for some tea. Upon their return to their compartment, Iris falls asleep. When she awakens, the the governess has vanished, and Iris is shocked to learn that the other passengers in her compartment claim that Miss Froy had never existed.

Many film critics have claimed that “THE LADY VANISHES” was Hitchcock’s best film during his English period as a director. I cannot agree or disagree, since the only other Hitchcock film made in Britain that I have seen was “THE 39 STEPS”. Unfortunately, I have not seen that particular movie since I was a teenager. However, I cannot deny that “THE LADY VANISHES” was a first-rate, yet slightly flawed movie. I also cannot deny that I consider it to be one of his better movies during the first half of his career as a director.

“THE LADY VANISHES” possessed several aspects that made it very enjoyable for me. One, the movie is set during a journey – in this case, a train journey across Europe. I am a big sucker for “road” movies, especially when it is well made. Two, Hitchcock and the movie’s two screenwriters, Sidney Gilliat and Frank Launder, made several changes to White’s novel – the most important that changed the Miss Foy character from an innocent who had stumbled across a secret to a genuine spy with some vital information for the British government. This particular change injected an air of necessity into the movie that allowed its story to be more suspenseful and urgent. The movie also benefited from some first-class photography by cinematographer Jack E. Cox. He did a solid job of conveying the illusion of travel. But I was especially impressed by two scenes featuring Cox’s use of a train window – a moment in which Iris sees Miss Foy’s name on a dining car window, and Gilbert’s discovery of Miss Foy’s existence by his glimpse of a tea box wrapping pressed briefly pressed against another window.

Hitchcock originally considered Lilli Palmer as his leading lady. But he changed his mind and went with unknown actress Margaret Lockwood, who was a fan of Ethel Lina White’s literary heroines. Personally, he made the right choice. I have nothing against Lilli Palmer, who was a talented actress in her own right. But Lockwood really made Iris her own with a passionate and intelligent performance. Iris could have easily become one of those beautiful, yet slightly bland damsels that solely depended upon men to help her. But Lockwood infused the character with a strong will and an intelligence that allowed her to be a major participant in the deduction of Miss Foy’s whereabouts. A successful stage actor, Michael Redgrave did not want to be a part of the “THE LADY VANISHES”, being reluctant to leave the stage to be in a film. John Gielgud convinced him to accept the role of Gilbert and Redgrave became an international star, following the movie’s release. And it is easy to see why. The man had a natural talent for the screen. And that is not something I can say about many other stage actors who have been lured into movies. Not only did he have a natural grace and charm, his portrayal of Gilbert struck me as both subtle and very funny. He and Lockwood projected a strong screen presence together. And I am surprised that “THE LADY VANISHES” proved to be the first of only two movies they made together. Pity.

“THE LADY VANISHES” was also blessed by a first-rate supporting cast. Paul Lukas gave a very subtle role as the European doctor that proved to be the main villain. Although her character proved to be the story’s main catalyst, Dame May Whitty had very few scenes in this movie. Yet, her warm and intelligent performance as the mysterious Miss Foy proved to have a strong presence throughout the story. Naunton Wayne and Basil Radford had worked on both the stage and in films throughout the 1930s before they worked together for the first time in “THE LADY VANISHES” as the two cricket-loving passengers, Caldicott and Charters. The pair created screen magic and would end up working together as a first-rate comic team for years to come. Cecil Parker and Linden Travers provided some subtle melodrama as a pair of adulterous lovers returning home to their spouses in Britain. Parker’s character, the pretentious “Mr. Todhunter”, ended up serving as an allegory of the appeasement supporters who preferred caving in to Adolf Hitler’s demands, instead of war. Mind you, the use of the “Mr. Todhunter” character seemed a bit heavy-handed, but effective.

As much as I enjoyed “THE LADY VANISHES”, I cannot deny that I found it somewhat flawed. All right, I found it flawed . . . period. The movie’s first twenty minutes at the Bandrika inn struck me as a little boring. Only Iris and Gilbert’s first meeting kept me from falling asleep. And if I must be frank, I found that scene a little hard to accept. After getting kicked out of his room for disturbing Iris’ sleep, Gilbert barged his way into her room and threatened to sleep there if she did not retract her complaint. Why was Iris’ room unlocked? What woman (or man) would leave his hotel room unlocked in a strange country, far from home? Even in 1938?

My biggest problem with “THE LADY VANISHES” turned out to be the British xenophobia that marred the movie’s last half hour. Now, a part of me realizes the movie may have been a propaganda piece against fascism. But in “THE LADY VANISHES”, I believe that Hitchcock, Gilliat and Launder went too far. One, the English-born “nun” (read actress) whom Dr. Hartz hired to guard the unconscious Miss Foy became outraged when she learned that her prisoner was also English. Let me see if I understand this. “The Nun” had no problems helping Dr. Hartz maintain a prisoner, as long as the latter was not a fellow Briton? Really? Even more incredulous was the shoot-out scene in which all of the English passengers found themselves inside the dining car and engaged in a shoot-out with Hartz and his fellow countrymen, after the train is diverted to a side track. Why not allow passengers from nations such as France, Belgium, Holland or the Scandinavian countries participate in the shootout? Why was it so important to Hitchcock and the screenwriters to allow only Britons to duke it out with Hartz and his men? This scene was one of the most blatant forms of xenophobia I had ever come across.

But you know what? Despite the xenophobia and the movie’s dull beginning, “THE LADY VANISHES” remains a big favorite of mine. It is still a first-rate political thriller that is infused with sharp humor and a very believable romance, thanks to Margaret Lockwood and Michael Redgrave. I am not surprised that in the end, “THE LADY VANISHES” ended up serving as the catalyst for Alfred Hitchcock’s Hollywood career.

Favorite Train Journey Movies (REVISED)

A few years ago, I had posted a list of my favorite movies featuring train journeys. Below is a new list. To be honest, the revisions are few, but . . . hey, I felt bored. So I made another list. Without further ado, here it is: 

FAVORITE TRAIN JOURNEY MOVIES (REVISED)

1. “Murder on the Orient Express” (1974) – Sidney Lumet directed this all-star adaptation of Agatha Christie’s 1934 novel about Hercule Poirot’s investigation of an American passenger aboard the famed Orient express. Albert Finney starred as Poirot.

2. “Silver Streak” (1976) – Gene Wilder, Richard Pryor and Jill Clayburgh starred in this comedy thriller about a man who stumbles across a murder and criminal conspiracy during a train journey from Los Angeles to Chicago. Arthur Hiller directed.

3. “North West Frontier” (1959) – Kenneth More and Lauren Bacall starred in this adventure about a British Army officer assigned to escort a young Indian prince across rebel-held territory in British India. J. Lee Thompson directed.

4. “From Russia With Love” (1963) – Sean Connery stars as James Bond in this action thriller about the British agent’s efforts to steal the Soviets’ encryption device, unaware that he is being used as a patsy by SPECTRE. Directed by Terence Young, Daniela Bianchi, Lotte Lenya, Pedro Armendáriz and Robert Shaw co-starred.

5. “The First Great Train Robbery” (1979) – Sean Connery, Donald Sutherland and Lesley Anne Down starred in this comedy thriller about Victorian thieves who make plans to rob a moving train filled with gold for troops during the Crimean War. The movie was written and directed by Michael Crichton.

6. “The Lady Vanishes” (1938) – Alfred Hitchcock directed Margaret Lindsay and Michael Redgrave in this thriller about a young Englishwoman, who realizes that an elderly female passenger has disappeared.

7. “The Tall Target” (1951) – Dick Powell starred in this thriller about a New York cop, who tries to prevent President-elect Abraham Lincoln from Confederate sympathizers out to assassinate him during his rail journey from New York to Washington D.C. for his inauguration. Paula Raymond, Adolphe Menjou and Ruby Dee co-starred.

8. “Narrow Margin” (1990) – Gene Hackman and Anne Archer starred in this crime thriller about an assistant districtattorney from Los Angeles, who escorts a witness to the murder of a Mafia boss’ accountant. James B. Sikking co-starred.

9. “Shanghai Express” (1932) – Josef von Starnberg directed Marlene Dietrich in this tale about about a dangerous rail journey through China during a civil war. Anna May Wong and Clive Brook co-starred.

10. “The Mystery of the Blue Train” (2005) – In this adaptation of Agatha Christie’s 1928 novel, Hercule Poirot investigates the brutal murder of an American heiress aboard the Blue Train. David Suchet and Elliot Gould starred.