“The Power of One” [PG-13] – 8/20

“THE POWER OF ONE”

PART VIII

“Are you sure that he’s here?” Elise McNeill asked her granddaughter. The two women climbed out of Olivia’s BMW convertible and approached the Union Square shop. 

Olivia sighed. “I don’t know. Last I heard, Andre went for a walk, last night. And according to Cole, he was missing this morning.” She placed her hand on the shop’s doorknob. It turned easily. “I guess he is here.” Olivia opened the door and the two witches entered. “Hello? Andre?”

The houngan emerged from the back of the shop. “Yeah, I’m here.” Andre strode toward the women.

“How long have you been here?” Gran demanded.

“Since five-thirty, this morning.” Andre paused, looking slightly uncomfortable. “I had trouble sleeping.”

Olivia sighed. “I knew I shouldn’t have told you about Cecile!”

Shaking his head, Andre replied, “No, no! It’s okay. At least I won’t have to waste my time with a wedding proposal.”

Both women reacted with distress at Andre’s remark. “You can’t be serious!” Oliva protested. “I mean . . . don’t you have a ring selected? Gran told me.”

Andre leaned against one of the shelves. “Yeah, I know. But since Cecile’s no longer interested in me . . .”

“Before you decide that’s true,” Gran said, interrupting, “why don’t you see how Cecile will react to your proposal?”

Olivia added, “May I see the ring?”

With a sigh, Andre moved away from the shelf and headed over to the one of the display cases filled with jewelry. He picked up an object and handed it over to Olivia. “That’s the ring I had planned to give to Cecile.”

A quick appraisal by Olivia enabled her to recognize that the ring had a French design and that it dated sometime back in the seventeenth century. She had studied Art History back in college. “Very nice,” she murmured. “There’s nothing supernatural about it, is there?”

“No,” Andre quickly said. “It’s perfectly fine.” He sighed. “So, you think I should ask her to marry me, anyway?”

Both women answered at the same time, “Yes!”

Andre turned to Olivia. “Well Livy, you’re about to make your first profit. I understand that the ring costs around a hundred-and-eighty dollars.”

Olivia walked over to the cash register. “I’ll get the receipt pad and cash box. By the way, did you guys find anything interesting?”

Gran replied, “We found a lot of interesting items. Especially that dagger with those markings on the hilt. Remember Andre?”

Looking slightly distracted, Andre nodded. “Oh. Yeah, I . . . uh, remember. The dagger that belonged to a dominion spirit.”

“A what?” Andre’s news took Olivia by surprise. “Did you say a dominion spirit?” She placed a tin box and the receipt pad on the counter. “Did anyone touch it?”

Gran added, “Andre did.”

“And he didn’t burn? Or get hurt any other way?” Olivia shook her head in disbelief. “Objects like that contain great power, and they usually affect beings who are lesser than dominion spirits – daemons of all kind . . . and mortals.” She paused. “Did the marking show to whom the dagger originally belonged?”

Andre snapped out of his distracted state. “I’ll show you.” He disappeared toward the back of the shop, while Olivia began to write the receipt for the ring. A few minutes later, the houngan returned with a bejeweled dagger.

Olivia reached out to take the dagger. Gran exclaimed, “No Livy! Don’t touch the . . .” She broke off, as her granddaughter grabbed hold of the dagger. “Goddess! You two?” She frowned. “I don’t understand. Neither of you were affected.”

“Maybe you’re wrong about it belonging to a dominion spirit,” Olivia said, as she examined the dagger’s hilt.

Shaking her head, Gran replied, “I can’t be. I saw the marking, myself. It belonged to Caspiel.”

“The dominion spirit associated with fire?” Olivia asked.

Realization lit up the elderly witch’s gray-blue eyes. “Of course! That’s why you two . . .” She turned to Andre. “Are any of your psi powers based on the fire element?”

Andre frowned. “Well, I’m an atmoskinetic. Which means that two of the powers I control – fire and electricity – are based on the fire element.”

“And Livy is a fire witch,” Gran finished. “No wonder you two weren’t affected. If that dagger had come from a dominion spirit associated with another element – like Carnesiel, who deals with the spirit element – you would have been in serious danger.”

Olivia turned the dagger over and spotted the marking on the bottom of the hilt. She gasped. “Is this Caspiel’s mark?” she demanded.

“Yeah,” Andre answered. “Why?”

“I think I may have seen it, before. On something else.” And idea came to the red-haired witch. “I’ve got to go.” She returned the dagger to Andre and headed for the shop’s entrance.

Gran demanded, “Where are you going?”

“To the station. There’s someone I need to check on.”

———–

The images of Donna Thompson removing hair from Wyatt’s brush continued to plague Phoebe’s mind. She found herself becoming so obsessed with the new nanny that she found it difficult to do her work.

Why did Donna’s actions bother her? Why did a knot in her stomach form every time she thought about the other woman? Piper had been right about one thing. There was nothing sinister about cleaning a baby’s hairbrush. So, why did she feel there was? Had it something to do with Donna’s reaction, when she had entered the nursery? Or that flash of guilt and fear in the other woman’s eyes?

Phoebe shook her head. She realized that she was allowing her imagination to get the best of her. If Donna had really wanted to harm Wyatt, she could have done it by now. Besides, the woman did help Piper save Wyatt from a demonic attack. If she had been interviewed before the demon, Piper would have been dead and Wyatt . . .

The middle Charmed One’s thoughts came to a screeching halt. “If she had been interviewed before the demon . . .” Of course! Phoebe shot out of her chair, as the epiphany struck her.

Donna must have arranged for the demon to attack Piper. Phoebe recalled her older sister stating that the Vodoun priestess had been the last to arrive that morning. It all made sense. Donna finds out about Wyatt and the position for his nanny. She arranges for a demon to pose as an applicant. Both the priestess and the demon make arrangements on the order of arrival. The demon attacks Piper. Donna comes to Piper’s rescue. Only Donna double-crosses her partner and helps Piper vanquish the demon before the latter can escape. And the priestess is hailed as a heroine and rewarded with the position of Wyatt’s nanny. Only . . . only Donna has not made any move against Wyatt. And Phoebe could not help but wonder why. Had Donna’s lack of action anything to do with future plans that involved Wyatt’s hair?

She had to warn Piper. Now. Phoebe reached for the telephone and dialed the number to P3. An employee answered and informed her that Piper was in a meeting with a liquor merchant at the moment, and could not be disturbed. Frustrated, Phoebe hung up and reached for her purse and coat. As she marched out of her office, her editor – Elise Rothman – materialized in her path toward the elevators. “Where are you going?” the older woman demanded.

“Lunch,” Phoebe replied. “I’m taking an early lunch, today.”

Elise glanced at her watch. “At ten forty-five in the morning? Aren’t you a bit early for lunch?” Her dark eyes penetrated Phoebe’s.

Oh shit! Phoebe realized that the editor had decided to become difficult, today. “Well . . . yeah. But see, I have this family emergency . . .”

“What kind of family emergency?”

“Um . . . Piper. She’s . . .” For once, Phoebe’s imagination failed her.

Elise smirked. “When you can remember the nature of your . . . family emergency, let me know. Meanwhile, I think you can forgo your early lunch for today.”

Annoyed by the older woman’s tone, Phoebe protested. “Elise! I’m not a schoolgirl, you know! So, do you mind not treating me like one?”

“I’m treating you like an employee who was forty minutes late for work, this morning!” Elise retorted. Her stare remained relentless. “Now, unless you can provide me with a genuine excuse, I suggest that you continue work.”

For a brief moment, Phoebe felt tempted to use the “boyfriend” excuse. But instinct told her that Jason would not cooperate. Especially after a few employees had spotted them indulging in foreplay inside her office, two weeks ago. She realized that if she had decided to use Jason to get her way, the other employees – especially Elise – would resent her. And make her life at work very miserable. A sigh left Phoebe’s mouth. “Fine. I’ll stay.”

“Good.” Elise flashed a bright smile at the younger woman and continued on her way. Unless she can find a way to contact Piper, Phoebe realized that the next hour and ten minutes might prove to be very long.

———

Darryl strolled into the squad room, followed by two members of his team – Carlotta Trujillo and Marcus Anderson. While the other two went toward their desks to deal with a suspect they had just arrested, the police lieutenant was surprised to find his partner seated behind her desk, staring at a computer screen.

“Olivia? What are you doing here?” he demanded, as he sat down in the chair, next to the redhead’s desk. “I thought that you had taken the day off to work in your shop?”

Her eyes still glued to the computer screen, Olivia curtly replied, “I did. An emergency had popped up. Regarding a certain nanny.”

“Huh?” Confusion whirled in Darryl’s brain, until he realized that Olivia had referred to Piper Halliwell’s new nanny. “Wait a minute. Are you talking about Wyatt’s new nanny? What about her?”

Olivia glanced up. “There’s something strange about her. Something I can’t put my finger on. And it has to do with an amulet that had allegedly been destroyed and a dagger in my shop.” Darryl’s partner then told him about her suspicions that had arisen from the nanny’s odd behavior and a magical dagger that bore a mark to the one she had spotted on the nanny’s amulet. “I’m checking our records to see if there’s anything on Donna Thompson.”

“And?”

With a sigh, Olivia finished, “So far, nothing. Well, I did come across three Donna Thompsons. But none match the description of Wyatt’s nanny. Also, one of them is dead.”

Darryl made a suggestion. “Why don’t you check the Department of Motor Vehicles?”

Olivia did as he had suggested. Within less than ten minutes, the pair received Donna Thompson’s DMV records. They also discovered that the nanny lived in the city’s Bernal Heights neighborhood. And that she had been born on March 14, 1968; in Oakland, California. The birth date seemed to have struck a familiar note with Olivia. “Wait a minute,” she murmured under her breath. “That date.”

“What is it?” Darryl asked.

The witch minimized the DMV page, before returning to the police department’s records. Olivia typed in the nanny’s name. Darryl gasped as he read the file. One of the Donna Thompsons in the Department files had also been born on March 14, 1968. In Oakland. Only this Miss Thompson had died on January 21, 1996. “I’ll be damned,” Darryl murmured.

“No kidding,” Olivia shot back, as she smiled broadly. “I’ve got her! Two Donna Thompsons born on the same day and in the same city? How often does that happen?” She switched back to the DMV site. “The driver license for our Miss Thompson will expire in March 2008. Which means that her last license had expired in 2002. Now, that previous license had been effective between March 1996 and March 2002. Which means that she had received this previous license about two months after the other Donna Thompson’s death.”

Darryl shook his head. “You know, this reminds me of Rex Buckland and Hannah Webster.”

“Who?”

“They were two warlocks who had gained control of the auction house that Prue worked at, some five years ago. These warlocks had murdered the real Rex Buckland and Hannah Webster, before assuming their identities. It could be that your Donna Thompson may have done the same. What does the Department’s files say about the dead Donna?”

Olivia returned to the police database. She whistled. “Wow! For someone who had died two months short of her 28th birthday, she sure led a full life. Arrested four times for possession of drugs between the ages of sixteen and twenty. She spent three years at the Valley State Prison for Women for pushing cocaine. Arrested in October 1995 for drug trafficking. Unfortunately, no conviction could be made. Three weeks after she was acquitted, someone murdered her by filling her capsules with drain cleaner. Probably her employer.”

A stunned expression appeared on Darryl’s face. “Wait a minute! Are you saying that Wyatt’s new nanny might be some kind of drug dealer?”

“Of course not!” Olivia protested. Then she hesitated. “Then again . . . I don’t know. But I do have a gut feeling that the real name of Wyatt’s nanny is not Donna Thompson. I think she may have been using that name to avoid detection.”

Darryl shook his head. “Yeah, but there’s something I don’t understand. She’s already close to Wyatt. She’s been close for the past three or four days. What the hell is she waiting for?”

Olivia sighed. “I wish I knew, Darryl. I wish I knew. And I dread the moment when we find out before it’s too late.”

END OF PART VIII

 

Images of WALT DISNEY WORLD

Below are images I took during two vacations I had spent at the Walt Disney World Resort in Lake Buena Vista, Florida in 2010 and 2012:

 

IMAGES OF WALT DISNEY WORLD

Monorail Approaching the Polynesian Resort

 

 

BoardWalk Inn

 

 

Disney Springs (formerly known as Downtown Disney) – the Marketplace

 

 

Disney Springs – Westside

 

 

Magic Kingdom – Entrance to Tomorrowland

 

 

Magic Kingdom – Big Thunder Railroad

 

 

EPCOT – Future World

 

 

EPCOT – World Showcase

 

 

Disney’s Hollywood Studios – Hollywood Boulevard

 

 

Disney’s Hollywood Studios – Sunset Boulevard

 

 

Animal Kingdom – Africa (Kilimanjaro Safaris)

 

 

Animal Kingdom – Asia (near Expedition Everest)

 

 

 

“GHOSTBUSTERS” (2016) Review

kinopoisk.ru-Ghostbusters-2750954

 

“GHOSTBUSTERS” (2016) Review

I cannot say that the summer of 2016 movie season produced a great number of first-rate films. There were a few that really impressed me. But I cannot deny that it has seen its share of controversy. One of the two controversies that ignited this summer proved to be over the casting for “GHOSTBUSTERS”, Paul Fieg’s reboot of Ivan Reitman’s pair of supernatural comedies from the 1980s.

The movie begins with physics researcher Dr. Erin Gilbert beginning her employment at Columbia University as a professor. However, her employment and bid for tenure is threatened when she learns that her former associate, Dr. Abigail “Abby” Yates had republished a book they had written together about the existence of paranormal phenomena such as ghosts. Erin decides to assist Abby and the latter’s new partner, engineer Dr. Jillian Holtzmann, on a paranormal investigation. The trio witnesses and documents a ghost, renewing Erin’s belief in ghosts. Unfortunately, Abby has posted a video clip of their investigation and Erin’s reaction, causing the latter to lose her job and tenure bid at Columbia. She joins Abby and Jillian’s project, but they are fired from their position at a technical college, when the director learns the nature of their research. The trio eventually open an office to capture and study ghosts above a Chinese restaurant and name themselves, “Conductors of the Metaphysical Examination”. They also hire a dim-witted, yet handsome receptionist named Kevin Beckman.

Meanwhile, a MTA worker named Patty Tolan witnesses a ghost inside one of the city’s subway tunnels. She contacts the “Conductors” and the group investigates. They witness, document and capture the ghost, using Jillian’s proton containment laser, but their proof is dismissed. Despite this, the group continues its ghost investigations. Patty, who is also history buff, joins the team and provides a historic knowledge of New York City and a redesigned hearse dubbed “Ecto-1”. The newly formed quartet slowly becomes aware of the fact that ghosts are being summoned by an occultist/mad scientist named Rowan North, who hopes to bring about the Apocalypse.

When I first heard that a reboot of the old “GHOSTBUSTERS” movies was being made, I simply groaned with dismay. I would not have minded a second sequel to the 1984 movie. But since one of the stars, Harold Ramis, had recently passed away, I realized it would never happened. But I was not that thrilled by the news of a reboot. And when I heard that the leads would all be women, I privately accused the film’s producers (in which Dan Ackroyd is one of them) of resorting to gimmick casting. A lot of people did and the movie became shrouded by controversy. But I went to see the movie anyway, due to my own curiosity and the public hullabaloo over the four leads. And you know what? I enjoyed it. I enjoyed “GHOSTBUSTERS” so much that it has become one of my favorite movies of the summer.

Mind you, “GHOSTBUSTERS” was not perfect. I found a few aspects of it to complain about. One, I have slightly mixed feelings about the movie’s antagonist, Rowan North. Rowan was an interesting character on his own. But I found it hard to imagine any living person going out of his or her way to commit suicide in order to transform into a supernatural being and bring about an apocalypse. That seemed a bit too much. I have to give kudos to Paul Feig for providing more details into the creation of the four “Conductors of the Metaphysical Examination” . . . or Ghostbusters. But it seemed at times that the movie’s set up of the four characters sped by a bit too fast, despite the addition of more details. There were other moments in the film in which the pacing seemed a bit too fast. And I found the character of Dr. Jillian Holtzmann a little superficial. Thanks to Katie Dippold and Feig’s screenplay, she seemed to have less depth than the other three leads. In fact, she seemed to mainly serve as the team’s comic relief. I wish Feig and Dippold had done more with her character.

Otherwise, I had no problems with “GHOSTBUSTERS”. One, the movie benefited from a first-class screen team. All of them – Melissa McCarthy, Kristen Wiig, Leslie Jones and Kate McKinnon – had a great chemistry together. There were complaints that Jones’ character, Patty Tolan, was not a scientist – especially since the actress is an African-American. I was thrilled that Patty was a history buff and avid reader, which is what I am. I was also a little teed off that many did not regard historical knowledge as “intelligent” as scientific knowledge. I can only assume that many believe we actually live in the world of “STAR TREK”.

And although I thought the idea of a human committing suicide in order to become a destructive supernatural force was a bit too much, I must admit that I also found this plot line very original. And to be honest, this world needs some kind of originality in movies, which seemed to be really lacking in today’s world. Even more original, the “Ghostbusters” in this film are not immediately acknowledged for their pursuit of the supernatural. The quartet keep encountering nay-sayers (including one portrayed by former Ghostbuster Bill Murray) and government officials in the form of New York’s dippy mayor and two Department of Homeland Security agents, who want them to remain silent on their findings. Again . . . original, for this was never done before in the two previous movies.

What was the best thing about this movie? Well, I thought it was a bit scary – especially in the sequence featuring the Ghostbusters’ final encounter with the supernatural Rowan North. More importantly, this was a damn funny movie. Hell, it was hilarious. Some of the movie’s funniest moments featured the four Ghostbusters’ interactions with their personal “dumb blonde” receptionist, Kevin Beckman, portrayed by Chris Hemsworth. Watching Melissa McCarthy’s Abby Yates react to Kristen Wiig’s infatuation with the idiotic and shallow Kevin was a joy to behold. Another hilarious scene featured the Ghostbusters’ encounter with a poltergeist at a live music venue. This led to a very close encounter for Leslie Jones’ Patty Tolan, who uttered one of my favorite lines:

“Okay, I don’t know if it was a race thing or a lady thing, but I’m mad as hell.”

But it is not surprising that “GHOSTBUSTERS” proved to be so funny to me. Paul Feig and the movie’s casting director really did this movie proud with a first-rate cast. I have already commented on the chemistry between the four leads. Melissa McCarthy was in top form as the sardonic Dr. Abby Yates. I really enjoyed how she mixed her character’s enthusiasm for her profession and her cynical sense of humor. Kristen Wiig provided a fine contrast as the more reserved Dr. Erin Gilbert, who not only renew her friendship with Abby, but also develops a hilarious infatuation toward the group’s receptionist. Leslie Jones gave a sharp, funny and intelligent performance as the group’s historian Patty Tolan. She was especially in fine form in the sequence featuring the live music venue. Although I had complaints about Feig and Dippold’s handling of the Dr. Jillian Holtzmann character, I must admit that Kate McKinnon more than made up for their shortcomings with a very funny and entertaining portrayal of the character.

The movie also featured some very funny performances from the likes of Andy Garcia (who portrayed the dippy New York mayor), Charles Dance, Steve Higgins, and Cecily Strong. The movie also provided solid performances from the likes of Michael K. Williams, Matt Walsh, Zach Woods and Ed Begley Jr. Neil Casey gave a very interesting performance as Rowan North, who proved to be one of the most eccentric and odd villains I have ever come across. And then there was Chris Hemsworth. Many have expressed surprise at his hilarious portrayal of the Ghostbusters’ dim-witted receptionist, Kevin Beckman. I was not surprised . . . just vastly entertained by his performance. After all, I have been aware of Hemsworth’s talent for comedy for the past five years. Last, but not least, the movie featured some surprising cameos. The most enjoyable ones proved to be those cameos from the original cast from the 1980s – namely producer Dan Ackroyd, Bill Murray, Ernie Hudson, Sigourney Weaver and Annie Potts.

Yes, “GHOSTBUSTERS” had a few shortcomings. I will not deny it. But for me, it had a lot more virtues. More importantly, it proved to be one of the most entertaining surprises I have encountered during the 2016 summer movie season. I feel that Paul Feig did an excellent job in rebooting Ivan Reitman’s two movies. He had ample help from the likes of screenwriter Katie Dippold and an excellent cast led by Melissa McCarthy, Kristen Wiig, Leslie Jones and Kate McKinnon.

“BABYLON 5” RETROSPECT: (2.16) “In the Shadow of Z’ha’dum”

babylon5-216_0719

“BABYLON 5” RETROSPECT: (2.16) “In the Shadow of Z’ha’dum”

About eighteen months ago, I had posted a list of my favorite Season Two episodes from the 1993-1998 syndicate series, “BABYLON 5”. And one of those episodes happened to be (2.16) “In the Shadow of Z’ha’dum”. For the sake of sentiment, I recently re-watched the episode to see if my views on it had changed.

The series’ second season – titled “The Coming of Shadows” – introduced a new character to the “BABYLON 5” universe. Captain John J. Sheridan first appeared in the season’s premiere episode, (2.01) “Points of Departure” to replace Babylon 5’s first commanding officer, Commander Jeffrey Sinclair. Like the latter, Captain Sheridan was a veteran of Earth Alliance’s last major conflict, the Earth-Minbari War, which was fought over a decade before the series’ setting. Sheridan was the only Earth military commander who scored a major victory over the Minbari, who possessed superior forces and weapons. Sheridan was also a married man, who became a widower following the death of his wife, Anna Sheridan. Two years earlier, Anna was killed while serving as a member of a planetary expedition aboard a ship called the Icarus for a mission to explore an obscure planet called Z’ha’dum.

The episode (2.02) “Revelations” dealt with Sheridan allegedly coming to terms with Anna’s death. But the events of “In the Shadow of Z’ha’dum” proved otherwise. The story began with the arrival of a Human named Mr. Morden to Babylon 5. Following his first appearance in the Season One episode, (1.13) “Signs and Portents”, Mr. Morden managed to form an alliance with Ambassador Londo Mollari of Centauri Prime. Using his connections with an ancient and powerful race of aliens known as “the Shadows” – whose homeworld happened to be Z’ha’dum, Morden helped the Centauri deal with its main enemy, the Narns. During Morden’s latest visit to Babylon 5, Security Chief Michael Garibaldi unintentionally identifies him as a regular visitor to the station during a private conversation with Sheridan. When the captain realizes that Morden had been a member of the Icarus expedition that led to Anna’s death, he has the man arrested and placed in a holding cell. Sheridan becomes obsessed with learning about the details of Anna’s fate; and also the details behind Morden’s survival and failure to inform Earth Alliance. This obsession leads the good captain to break security rules, alienate members of command staff and attract the attention of the Centauri, Minbar and Vorlon ambassadors.

During my latest viewing of “In the Shadow of Z’ha’dum”, I tried to pinpoint what I did not like about it. I managed to find one aspect that struck me as unappealing. Sheridan’s manipulation of resident telepath Talia Winters’ only meeting with Morden struck me as rather forced. David J. Eagle’s direction and Christopher Franke’s score tried a little too hard in making this scene dramatic by amping up the suspense. The scene’s build up struck me as over-the-top that it almost overshadowed the pay-off of Talia and Morden’s actual meeting. It is a flaw I have spotted in other “BABYLON 5” episodes – even in some of its best.

“In the Shadow of Z’ha’dum” may not have be perfect, but I believe it might be one of the best episodes of Season Two . . . and in the entire season. The ironic thing is that hardly any action occurred in this episode, aside from a well deserved slap that Sheridan received from Talia. And yet, “In the Shadow of Z’ha’dum not only helped drive the series’ main narrative forward, it also foreshadowed two major story arcs in future episodes – Sheridan’s conflict with the Shadows and Garabaldi’s role as Babylon 5’s security chief. It also foreshadowed a minor plot – namely Morden’s future fate. These story lines are major examples of series creator J. Michael Straczynski’s use of foreshadow in his writing. And as far as I am concerned, no one else did it better other than George Lucas for his “STAR WARS” movie franchise.

However, I believe the best thing about “In the Shadow of Z’ha’dum” was the development of the John Sheridan character. Many fans had not been pleased when Bruce Boxleitner replaced the late Michael O’Hare, who portrayed Jeffrey Sinclair, as the series’ new leading man. They accused the Sheridan character of being lightweight and dubbed him with the nickname of “Captain Smiley”. Personally, I never had any problems with Sheridan before this episode. But this is the first time the series ever focused upon the negative aspects of Sheridan’s character. And I found it very interesting. “Revelations” had revealed that Sheridan had yet to recover from his wife’s death. “In the Shadow of Z’ha’dum” revealed that Sheridan’s inability to recover from his grief brought out the worst of him – his temper, his penchant for brooding, his stubborness, his talent for manipulation and most importantly, his ruthlessness. Sheridan’s reputation as “Captain Smiley” disappeared after this episode. For good.

The episode also featured a minor story line regarding the arrival of an Earth Alliance official named Pierce Macabee. The latter represented Earth Alliance’s Ministry of Peace, which served as a security and propaganda machine for President Morgan Clark’s administration. Macabee arrived at Babylon 5 to recruit the station’s crew into Earth Alliance’s new paramilitary organization, Nightwatch. These members were instructed to uncover and report on what they perceived to be “subversive” activities – namely open criticism and defiance of Clark’s Administration. This story line was introduced in such a subtle manner that it almost seemed like afterthought. Almost. It allowed audiences to hear Macabee’s speech about Nightwatch and watch him recruit some of the station’s crew – including Zack Allen, who served with Babylon 5’s security force under Garibaldi. Although Zack joined Nightwatch simply to earn extra credits, his decision will prove to have a major impact upon the series’ main narrative, early in Season Three. The Nightwatch story arc proved to be another example of Straczynski’s talent for using a minor story line as foreshadow. Very few writers and producers seemed capable of using this narrative device with any strong effect. Pity.

“In the Shadow of Z’ha’dum” also featured some first-rate performances. Regular cast members such as Claudia Christian, Mira Furlan, Jerry Doyle and Richard Biggs gave strong supportive performances. Although I was critical of the scene featuring Talia Winters’ encounter with Mr. Morden, I certainly had no problems with Andrea Thompson’s performance. The actress did an excellent job in conveying Talia’s horror and later, outrage over Sheridan’s actions. Jeff Conway really made the role of Zack Allen his own in this particular episode. I have always believed that one aspect that made a performer a first-rate screen actor or actress, is his or her ability to react to other characters. Conway was very effective in utilizing this acting tool in his scenes with Boxleitner and Doyle. And his performances in scenes with certain supporting characters struck me as effective and subtle at the same time. Especially in one scene in which Zack arrested Mr. Morden. I also have to commend Alex Hyde-White for his guest-starring turn as Nightwatch recruiter, Pierce Macabee. He did a superb job in projecting the Ministry of Peace’s menace with such subtle charm.

Ed Wasser, who made such an impression as the quiet, yet menacing agent for the Shadows – Mr. Morden – in previous episodes, continued his excellent work in this episode. However, “In the Shadow of Z’ha’dum” also featured other dimensions to Morden’s personality – fear, surprise and impatience – that Wasser conveyed with great skill. I especially enjoyed his work with both Stephen Furst and leading man Bruce Boxleitner. I have always been a fan of Furst since I first saw him in the 1978 comedy, “ANIMAL HOUSE”. His time on NBC’s “ST. ELSEWHERE” and “BABYLON 5” revealed his talent for dramatic acting. Furst effectively combined his skills for both drama and comedy in one particular in which Centauri Ambassador Aide Vir openly expressed his dislike for Morden. It is one of my favorite moments from the series.

Although the “Captain Smiley” nickname for the John Sheridan character disappeared after “In the Shadow of Z’ha’dum” first aired on television, Bruce Boxleitner’s reputation as an actor suddenly gained momentum among the series’ fans. I do not understand why. I have seen Boxleitner portray the darker aspects in previous roles very effectively. But I must say that I believe his performance in this episode may end up being regarded as one of his best. Boxleitner was superb as a ruthless Sheridan, obsessed with not only learning the truth about his wife’s death, but also Morden’s survival and revenge. It is a pity that the Emmys rarely acknowledge excellent acting or writing in the Science-Fiction/Fantasy genre.

“In the Shadow of Z’ha’dum” may not be my favorite Season Two episode from “BABYLON 5”. But it is definitely my second favorite. And it is certainly one of my favorite episodes of the series. J. Michael Straczynski wrote an excellent episode about the consequences of grief for the series’ main character. Thanks to fine writing, first-rate direction and excellent performances from a talented cast – especially series lead Bruce Boxleitner.

 

 

R.I.P. Stephen Furst (1954-2017)

 

“The Power of One” [PG-13] – 7/20

“THE POWER OF ONE”

PART VII

While Cole busied himself with putting the finishing touches to the Lamb Kidneys Madeira that he had prepared, Andre entered the penthouse’s kitchen. “Is everything ready?” the latter asked.

“Yeah,” Cole replied. He picked up the platter of lamb kidneys and carried it over to the dining table. Andre placed a dish of Artichokes Bernaise on the table, next to the kidneys. “I only hope this doesn’t get cold, before the ladies arrive.”

Andre shook his head in disbelief. “Man, how in the hell did you find the time to prepare all of this?”

“Left the office, early.” Cole’s eyes closely examined the table’s settings. He spotted one of the knives out of place and corrected the mistake. “Don’t worry about Cecile. I had dropped her off at Macy’s downtown for some shopping. Olivia should have picked her up, by now.”

Andre shot back, “I didn’t ask.”

“Yet.” Cole glanced at his friend. “So, how was your day?”

The houngan’s mouth opened momentarily. Then he shut it. “Oh, what the hell!” he finally said. “I’ve already told Olivia and her grandmother.”

Cole frowned. “Told them what?”

A brief pause followed, before Andre declared with a smile, “I plan to ask Cecile to marry me.”

After Cecile’s revelation of her plans to dump Andre, Cole realized that his friend’s news came as a great surprise. The half-daemon stared at his friend with a stunned expression. “Say that . . . Are you serious? You really plan to marry Cecile?”

“Well, if she accepts my proposal.” Andre sighed. “I know. You’re a bit surprised. To be honest, I’ve been thinking of marrying her ever since Bruce and Barbara’s wedding. But . . . okay, maybe I was a little afraid over how she would react. You know Cecile. She tends to keep her feelings to herself, sometimes.”

Cole murmured, “No kidding.”

Andre stared at him. “What?”

“Nothing.”

The other man continued, “Anyway, I wasn’t sure if Cecile might be interested in marriage. She always seemed so independent, sometimes. You know – ‘me against the world’.” Andre frowned. “God, I hope I’m wrong.”

Cole replied before he could think otherwise, “Don’t worry. You’re not.”

Once more, Andre stared at the half-daemon. Hard. “Now, what in the hell did you mean by that?”

Realizing that he had nearly broke Cecile’s confidence, Cole shook his head. “It’s nothing. I was just . . . Never mind.”

“No, you were about to say something about Cecile. What?”

Cole muttered a silent oath. For once in his life, he had failed to keep his big mouth shut. Perhaps he was growing soft in his increasing age. He took a deep breath. “Look, I don’t know how to tell you this. But . . . Cecile plans to break up with you.”

“What?” Disbelief shone in Andre’s eyes.

“She plans to break up with you,” Cole repeated. “Cecile’s tired of being a girlfriend. She told me that she wants . . . more. Something better. She then told me that what she really wanted was . . .” The doorbell rang. Cole turned away. “Huh, looks like they’re here.” He walked over to the door.

Andre cried out, “Hey! What exactly does she want?”

But Cole barely heard his friend’s words. Opening the door, he found Olivia and Cecile standing in the hallway – dressed for dinner. “Ladies,” he politely greeted. “Dinner is ready.”

Both women nodded mutely and entered the penthouse. Judging from their expressions, neither seemed to be in a positive mood. Cecile wore a sullen expression. And Olivia looked as if someone had stunned her with a cattle prod. Cole shot a quick glance at Andre and noticed that the latter did not look any happier. The half-daemon sighed. It promised to be a long and difficult night.

———–

Daley closed the book on her kitchen table, with an air of satisfaction. Then she held up the amulet that hung around her neck. She had no idea that the object she now possessed, held so much power. The amulet had been created by a dominion spirit named Caspiel. According to the book she had just finished reading, Caspiel’s amulet blocked the magical and psychic abilities of all beings – aside from fellow dominion spirits. Caspiel had also created a dagger that could kill any being – magical or otherwise with a mere stab wound. That is . . . any being aside from a dominion spirit or deity. Apparently, Caspiel had lost track of both the amulet and the dagger, a long time ago. Daley wondered if he still existed.

The amulet did present one problem. Olivia McNeill had spotted it. And seemed very curious, when Daley tried her level best to make sure that she did not have a chance to examine. The sorceress realized that she had to do something about that. Killing the witch seemed out of the question. At least for the moment. However, replacing the amulet with another that bore a strong resemblance seems like a possible solution. Not only would Daley be able to fake out the curious witch, she could hide the genuine amulet in a pocket.

A quick glance at the calendar on the kitchen wall told Daley that the half-moon would arrive on the day after tomorrow. She had everything needed to perform the ritual – except for one item. A strand or two of Wyatt Halliwell’s hair from his hairbrush should do the trick.

Once she manages to acquire the infant’s powers, one last task was needed to complete the ritual. Namely the baby’s death. Daley winced inwardly at the idea of killing a nine month-old baby. But it had to be done. With Wyatt still alive, the danger of someone reversing the ritual would remain constant. Especially since the baby’s mother happened to be acquainted with a Vodoun priest and priestess. The moment she finally possess the infant’s powers, Daley would have to kill Wyatt. The only question remained was . . . how.

————

Cole woke up the following morning with great reluctance. He would prefer to remain in bed. Especially after last night’s near disastrous dinner. But he had a job to deal with. And there was the conversation that he and Andre needed to finish.

Hardly a soul had exchanged a word, last night. Except to praise Cole’s cooking. Or comment about some recent incident – like Cecile’s business deal with the McNeills or the latest demonic attack upon Wyatt Halliwell. Olivia had brought up the subject of Wyatt’s new nanny, but one glare from Cecile had ended the topic. Yet, not once did anyone discuss the cause of the tension that had sprung up between the two couples. With emotions seemingly at the breaking point, no one dared.

Once Olivia and Cecile had left, Cole had intended to finish his conversation with Andre. Only, the houngan decided that he needed a breath of fresh air and left for a walk. By the time he had returned, Cole was fast asleep.

After the half-daemon took his morning shower and dressed for work, he went into one of the guest bedrooms to talk with Andre. Only the houngan was nowhere to be found. Either the latter had failed to return from his walk. Or Andre had left early to avoid another conversation. Cole heaved a frustrated sigh and continued to finish preparing for work. After gathering his trench coat and suitcase, he beamed to the floor below the penthouse and rang the doorbell to Olivia’s apartment.

The redhead immediately opened the door. “Hi,” she greeted quietly.

“Hi.” Cole flashed a brief smile before exchanging a light kiss with Olivia. “Is Cecile ready?”

Olivia’s expression became strained. “She will be in a few minutes.” Then she stepped aside, and allowed Cole to enter the apartment. Once she closed the door, she added, “Uh . . . I realize that it seemed a bit tense at dinner, yesterday. And the reason is that Cecile had told me some weird ass news. It seems she plans to break . . .”

“. . . break up with Andre,” Cole grimly finished. Olivia’s green eyes widened in surprise. “Yeah, she told me the day before yesterday.”

“What? You mean to say that she told you first?”

Cole sighed. “Olivia, I had noticed that she had been acting weird, so I dragged it out of her.” He paused. “And I just told Andre, yesterday.”

Shaking her head, Olivia commented, “No wonder he seemed subdued, last night. So much for his plans for a wedding.”

“Oh, so he also told you about that?” Cole heaved another sigh. “Hmmm. Well, I guess it won’t happen, after all. Just as well, I guess.”

Olivia stared at him. “What do you mean by that?”

Oh God! “What I mean is . . .” Cole broke off, as Cecile entered the living room.

The New Orleans woman eyed the couple suspiciously. “What’s going on with you two?” she demanded.

“Nothing.” Cole returned her gaze with an innocent expression. He wondered if the Vodoun priestess knew that he and Olivia had been discussing about her and Andre. “Are you ready?”

Cecile murmured in a morose voice, “Yeah. Let’s go.” Before she reached the door, she stopped abruptly and glanced around. “By the way,” she said with a frown, “where’s Andre?”

“He wasn’t in his room, when I woke up,” Cole answered. “I guess he decided to head for Olivia’s shop a little early.”

Olivia added, “It’s possible. He has a key.”

Cecile sniffed. “Hmmm. Well, let’s go.” She started toward the door. Cole followed. “See you, Livy.”

As he followed Cecile into the hallway, Cole overheard Olivia’s voice. “I’ll call around lunch.” But Cecile was already halfway down the corridor.

———-

A quick glance at the radio clock on her night table told Phoebe that it was thirty-seven minutes past eight, this morning. And that she was running late. She bit back a frustrated sigh and continued to dress. Since it seemed obvious that she would not make it to the office on time, she might as well not bother to rush.

Once she finished dressing, the middle Charmed One picked up her purse and briefcase, and left her bedroom. She marched along the hallway, when she heard humming from one of the bedrooms. From Wyatt’s nursery. Phoebe decided that a quick good-bye kiss to her nephew would not hurt. She peeked inside the room and found Wyatt fully awake and playing with a red ball inside his crib. The new nanny sat in a nearby chair, fiddling with Wyatt’s hairbrush.

“Good morning!” Phoebe cheerfully greeted.

Ms. Thompson – or Donna, as she preferred to be called – glanced up with a gasp on her lips. “Oh! Uh . . . good morning. Um . . . don’t you usually leave a little earlier?”

“I’m running a bit late, this morning.” Phoebe strode into the nursery. “That’s a nice tune you were humming. I’ve never heard it, before.”

Donna’s shoulders sagged with relief. Curious. “Oh that,” she replied. “It’s just an old tune that my mama used to sing to me. I think it goes back to the time of slavery.”

“Oh . . . uh, how . . .” Nearly at a loss for words, Phoebe finished lamely, “How historic. Huh. Oh well. I . . . I just wanted to say good-bye to Wyatt.” She approached the crib and lifted her nephew from the crib and into her arms. Then she rocked him for a few seconds, before planting a light kiss on his forehead. “I’ll see you later, young man,” she said in a baby voice. Phoebe returned Wyatt to inside his crib and turned to Donna. “I guess I’ll be seeing you later.”

The nanny responded with a polite nod. Phoebe headed for the door. For some unexplainable reason, she paused and glanced behind her. And saw Donna remove a strand of hair from Wyatt’s brush and place it on . . . something. A handkerchief? A piece of paper? Suspicion welled within the Charmed One. What did Donna want with . . .?

“Phoebe!” Piper’s voice cried from downstairs. “Let’s go! You’re already ten minutes late!”

Donna glanced up. Phoebe shot the nanny a quick smile and disappeared into the hallway. The Charmed One found her older sister in the foyer, donning a suede jacket. “Well, it’s about time!” Piper grumbled. “Next time, learn to set your clock before you go to bed. What the hell happened to you, this morning?”

A breathless Phoebe reached for her coat. “It’s nothing. I . . .” Memories of Donna’s actions continued to tug at her thoughts. “Piper, are you sure that you did the right thing in hiring Donna?”

Piper frowned at the younger woman. “What? Did you have a premonition or something?”

“No, I . . .” Phoebe hesitated, before she proceeded to tell her sister what she had witnessed just a few minutes ago.

A mixture of disbelief and scorn filled Piper’s dark eyes. “C’mon Phoebe! You’ve got to be kidding! You’re suspicious of Donna, because she was cleaning Wyatt’s hairbrush?”

“I think she was placing his hair in a handkerchief, or a napkin or something,” Phoebe indignantly shot back. “Don’t you find that strange?” She donned her coat.

“No. But I do thank her for being neat,” Piper sarcastically replied. “Phoebe, has it ever occurred to you that she was preventing Wyatt’s hair from falling on the floor?”

Phoebe opened her mouth to protest, but could not find an argument to Piper’s suggestion. “I guess not.”

“Okay honey,” Piper said, patting Phoebe’s shoulder. “You’ve had your shot at being Nancy Drew for the day. It’s time for you to be ‘Dear Phoebe’. Let’s get to work.”

A sigh left Phoebe’s mouth, as she followed her older sister out of the door.

———–

The moment that Phoebe Halliwell’s figure disappeared from the doorway, Daley heaved a heartfelt sigh of relief. Talk about close call! For a moment, she feared that the amulet no longer worked on the seer.

She overheard the front door slam shut. The sorceress smiled and resumed her task. After removing the last strand of hair from Wyatt’s brush, she placed it on the handkerchief in her lap. Then she folded the piece of cloth and placed it, inside her purse.

Daley’s smile stretched wider. Mission accomplished.

END OF PART VII

Five Favorite Episodes of “UNDERGROUND” Season One (2016)

noahrosalee

Below is a list of my five favorite episodes from the WGN series, “UNDERGROUND”. Created by Misha Green and Joe Pokaski, the series stars Jurnee Smollett-Bell and Aldis Hodge:

FIVE FAVORITE EPISODES OF “UNDERGROUND” SEASON ONE (2016)

1 - 1.05 Run and Guns

1. (1.05) “Run & Gun” – The attempt by the escapees from the Macon plantation to catch a northbound train out of the state is complicated at every turn; while Tom and Susanna Macon have the remaining slaves – especially Pearly Mae, who was captured while trying to run – questioned about their plans.

2 - 1.09 Black and Blue

2. (1.09) “Black & Blue” – One of the escapees, former house slave Rosalee, is captured in a small Kentucky town and held at a slaughter house, while fellow escapees Noah and Cato plot to rescue her. Underground Railroad agent John Hawkes (who is also Tom Mason’s brother) learns of his wife Elizabeth’s reckless action to save the orphaned escapee Boo from her ex-fiancé and U.S. Federal Marshal Kyle Risdin.

3 - 1.04 Firefly

3. (1.04) “Firefly” – A notorious slave hunter named August Pullman and his son Ben track Noah and Rosalee, following their escape from the Macon plantation at the end of the previous episode. The other slaves involved in Noah’s plot contemplate running, as well. Meanwhile, John and Elizabeth face a lethal predicament, when one of the runaways they are sheltering turns hostile.

5 - 1.01 Macon Seven

4. (1.01) “The Macon 7” – In the series premiere, Noah begins to plot an escape from the Macon plantation to the Ohio River and free states. He contemplates on choosing which slaves to be included in his plan, while dealing with a hostile Cato, who also happens to be one of the plantation field drivers.

4 - 1.07 Cradle

5. (1.07) “Cradle” – This episode featured a collection of vignettes about the younger characters – all children – facing the harsh realities of the world in antebellum America.

St. Paul Sandwich

Below is an article about the dish known as St. Paul Sandwich:

 

ST. PAUL SANDWICH

I am a California girl – born and bred. Yet, a part of me is also a Midwesterner. Most of my family – both paternal and maternal – are from St. Louis, Missouri. And I had spent part of my childhood in the Gateway City.  One of my fondest memories of St. Louis is the collection of various Chinese-American fast food joints spread throughout the city. I might as well say it. Some of the best Chinese-American fast food I have ever eaten was in St. Louis. And one of my all time favorite dishes to emerge from these eateries was the St. Paul sandwich.

The origin of the St. Paul sandwich dates back to the early 1940s, when it was created to appeal Midwesterners’ palates. In fact, the sandwich is believed to be an example of early fusion cuisine. According to legend, a cook or chef named Steven Yuen invented the St. Paul sandwich at an eatery called Park Chop Suey in Lafayette Square, a neighborhood near downtown St. Louis. Yuen named the dish after his hometown of St. Paul, Minnesota. Food writers James Beard and Evan Jones believed that the St. Paul sandwich was an early variation of another dish called the Denver sandwich, which originated in the Colorado city around 1907.

The St. Paul sandwich consists of an egg foo young patty; which is made with egg, mung bean sprouts, and minced white onions; between two slices of white bread. Included in the sandwich are dill pickle slices, white onion, mayonnaise, lettuce, and tomato. The St. Paul sandwich also comes in different combinations and specials that include chicken, pork, shrimp, beef, and other varieties. Originally, the St. Paul sandwich contained four pieces of white bread with chicken and egg stuffed inside. Later, it simply consisted of an egg and hamburger on a bun.

The dish can be found in St. Louis and other cities in Missouri like Jefferson City, Columbia and Springfield. It can also be found in Chinese-American restaurants in California and Oregon, notably at the Lung Fung in the Kenton neighborhood of Portland, Oregon. It is usually served with regional names like “Egg Foo Young on Bun”. I have eaten Chinese-American fast food in Los Angeles, San Diego, Washington D.C. and Chicago and have yet to encounter the St. Paul sandwich in any of these cities.

Below is a recipe for St. Paul sandwich from the Feast Magazine website:

St. Paul Sandwich

Ingredients

Canola oil, for deep-frying
1 cup fresh bean sprouts
¼ cup diced or thinly sliced onion
2 Tbsp diced green bell pepper
3 small cooked shrimp, peeled
3 Tbsp diced or shredded poached chicken
3 pieces cooked beef (1/8 inch thick, 1 inch wide and 1½ inches long)
1 large egg
¼ tsp cornstarch
1 Tbsp mayonnaise
2 slices white bread
Iceberg lettuce leaf
2 thin slices tomato
3 to 4 dill pickle slices

Preparation

Pour about 4 cups oil into a deep-fryer or deep saucepan. Bring to 375ºF.

Break bean sprouts by crushing them lightly in the palm of your hand. Place in medium mixing bowl. Add onion, green pepper, shrimp, chicken and beef. Stir to combine.

Beat egg lightly with a fork in a small bowl. Mix in cornstarch. Pour egg mixture over the sprouts mixture. Stir well.

Place egg mixture in a shallow metal ladle 4¼ inches wide (big enough to hold it all).

Test the heat of the oil by throwing in a bean sprout. The sprout will immediately pop to the top if the oil is hot enough.

When oil is hot enough, gradually lower full ladle into hot oil, but don’t allow top of egg mixture to drop into the oil. The egg patty will cook in the ladle. Some hot oil will seep over the edges of the ladle. Cook until almost done, 2 to 3 minutes, then spoon a little of the hot oil over the top of the patty to finish the cooking.

Transfer egg patty to a slotted spoon. If any egg mixture drips out, return the patty to the ladle and place in the hot oil for an additional minute. The patty should be uniformly browned and sealed.

Spread mayonnaise on one slice of bread. Top with the iceberg lettuce and tomato slices. Slide the cooked egg patty onto the other slice of bread. Garnish with pickles. Close the sandwich. Wrap bottom in waxed paper and serve immediately.

Tester’s note: If you do not have a deep fryer, you can use a skillet, but the texture will not be the same. Heat 1 Tbsp oil in a 6-inch skillet; sauté the onion and green pepper over medium heat until the onion is translucent. Add the shrimp, chicken and beef and then the egg-cornstarch mixture; cook, stirring constantly, until the egg is scrambled.